Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Chapter One, Part Four

“I’m blind!” Dr. Speransky screamed. “Call a doctor, fast!”

“There’s no time for a doctor.” Returning to the experiment, Dr. Frolov did not look to see, but he knew the light was still flaring in the sky. “We must now consider what this experiment teaches us with regard to the intimate functional activity of the cortex. Here! Let me lead you!” He grabbed Dr. Speransky’s arms. However, the main interest of the experiments of Dr. Friedman lay in the investigation whether a differentiation which had been established for the conditioned stimulus to one reflex would be preserved after its transformation.

“Get away from me! Don’t touch me.” Jerking free, Dr. Speransky fumbled his way into the special laboratory. Dr. Frolov caught a glimpse of him trying to use the phone. Dr. Frolov did not wait to see more. Nor did he try to use his car. The recovery of an extinguished conditioned reflex is found in both cases to be temporary. Dr. Frolov knew this, knew that inside the building all the research rooms (four to each floor) were isolated from one another by a cross-shaped corridor; the top and ground floors, where these rooms were situated, were separated by an intermediate floor.

Unless he reached the shelter quickly, Dr. Frolov knew that each experiment began with the special stimulus of a buzzer or a metronome—yet another important factor in determining the rate of experimental extinction is the length of pause between successive repetitions of the special stimulus without reinforcement. Each experiment began with the special stimulus of a buzzer or a metronome—yet another important factor in determining the rate of experimental extinction is the length of pause between successive repetitions of the special stimulus without reinforcement. He headed for the shelter, running all the way.

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