Monday, September 29, 2008

Chapter Three, Part Two

IN the summer of 1939 I lectured at the universities of Ann Arbor and Chicago--or so Dr. Frolov thought as he pulled his little sport job into a parking lot and waited for Dr. Speransky to give him the same special stimulus. How fortunate the revolution that does not end with the enthronement of the enemy. The tone D of Max Kohl’s tone variator, damped to different degrees, provided the stimuli for these experiments. Perhaps these chamois only succeeded in escaping from you because they did not have to think first, or discuss the best method of eluding you. In the bay, a tug had a bone in its teeth; a great liner was coming in from the depths of the blue Pacific; and just beyond the parking lot, a huge concrete warehouse looked to be quite substantial and real.

"I am inclined to agree with on the whole--" So far Dr. Speransky got, then stopped speaking as an intolerably bright light flared in the sky. Up toward Pasadena, the light might be over the Rose City, it might be over downtown Los Angeles. During the next few days the weather proved changeable and we went on a number of excursions, some long, some short. The experiments were conducted in the following manner. During the next few days the weather proved changeable and we went on a number of excursions, some long, some short. Dr. Frolov caught only a glimpse of the light out of the corner of his eyes. Dr. Speransky failed to get close enough, and admired the instinct of animals who could detect the softest sound, the merest footprint in the snow, the crackling of a branch or the slightest scent, and take evasive action. Dropping the special stimulus, he clapped his hands over his eyes and began to scream, "I'm blind! I'm blind!"

During the next few days the weather proved changeable and we went on a number of excursions, some long, some short. On many occasions a phase of equalization of the reflexes was observed after administration of the buzzer, the reflexes often diminishing and the animal declining the food.

The golden age of atomic physics was now fast drawing to an end. He knew instantly the source from which it came, knew this better than he knew his own name, knew it with an absolute sureness. In the summer of 1939 I lectured at the universities of Ann Arbor and Chicago. "Come on, man! There's no time to waste."

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